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LatPro Announces Scholarship Finalists – help us choose one winner!

We are proud to announce the six finalists for the current LatPro Scholarship award, which include future political activists, physicians, psychologists, lawyers, policy analysts, and computer scientists.   We received thousands of exceptional applications, but we feel that these candidates showed the best combination of passion, integrity, and dedication to their chosen fields of study.

Now we need your help in choosing the one scholarship award winner!  The final selection process will involve three different factors:

  1.   outside voting (Facebook ‘Like’ and other social media options on the left side of the essays)
  2.   comments left by visitors
  3.   the LatPro Scholarship committee’s scoring of the student’s application and essay

The one winner will be announced on Wednesday, June 5th.  Please help us with our selection by voting for your favorite essay (Facebook ‘Like’ and other social media sharing options on the left side of the essays) and by leaving comments or clicking the ‘star’ icon above the comments section.

Jessica An, Political Science, University of San Diego

jessica anI was born in Los Angeles, California in the year 1993. I lived in Mexico for the first three years of my life. My first language was therefore Spanish, and my second was Korean. I distinctly remember my first day of class in the United States. I remember my mom closing the door to my first grade class and recall crying and feeling afraid because everything was foreign to me. My fellow classmate’s clothing style, the lack of children’s crafts on the wall, the blonde-haired 6-year-olds all overwhelmed me. What I recall the most, however, and what should have scarred me but did not, was the teasing I received because I did not speak English.

Click to read Jessica’s entire essay and vote!

Jacqueline Basulto, Pre-Med, Columbia University

jacqueline basulto_2Like the surgeons at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital who prolonged my grandfather’s time on earth and inconspicuously improved my life, I wish to provide a similar, invaluable service to other families. If I save one person a day during my time as a doctor, I will be planting the seeds for generations of people who will be impacted by the memory of their loved ones. Though everyone must die one day, the work surgeons do to extend people’s lives is a precious service I yearn to be a part of.

Click to read Jacqueline’s entire essay and vote!

Eliza Escobedo, Psychology, University of Arizona

Eliza Escobedo_2Growing up illiterate was one of the biggest challenges I had to overcome. In elementary school, dyslexia had crippled my reading skills and made simple math problems impossible to solve. Sounding out words was unhelpful and having teachers read to me was pointless. I was held back a year and placed in special education to get the extra help I needed to improve my reading skills. But I learned quickly that the system was flawed…The reason why I chose a major in psychology is because I want to help clients work through their problems.

Click to read Eliza’s entire essay and vote!

Jordanna Fonseca, Political Science/International Relations, Florida International University

jordanna fonseca_2Deciding to become a Political Science major came naturally to me. Since I was a young girl, I would sit and watch the news, fascinated with the way the United States government functioned as well as with the media that would broadcast its trials and tribulations. In middle school, my appreciation for politics grew with an inspiring civics teacher that taught me the ins and outs of government. From this teacher, I learned to speak in front of an audience, as well as to take positions on issues that I felt were politically salient. Although I already figured that I would one day study politics and government, in the seventh grade I became sure of it – I would someday attend college as a Political Science major.

Click to read Jordanna’s entire essay and vote!

Crissel Rodriguez, International Studies, Chapman University

crissel rodriguez_2As an undergraduate my coursework fostered a deep interest in me in how governments, organizations and political actors shape the social, economic and political conditions of marginalized populations. In college I fought alongside many students for comprehensive immigration reform at local, state and federal levels. This issue not only affects our community at large, but negatively impacts the fabric of our families that are constantly being threatened by deportation. It creates an overworked and underpaid labor force that has little legal recourse. Inspired by my parents’ story, I dedicated my time to mentoring undocumented youth and worked in political campaigns to address the needs of underserved Latino and African American neighborhoods.

Click to read Crissel’s entire essay and vote!

Javier Valerio, Computer Science, MiraCosta College

javiervalerio_2One of my biggest priorities in life has always been education. Since I was a child, I have had a particular interest in computers and technology. Since then, nothing has changed. I remember that whenever my family’s computer broke, I would eagerly repair and reinstall all the software again. In fact, when I installed the CD burner in the PC for the first time by myself, I realized that dealing with computers was all I wanted to pursue as a career. These days, technology is becoming essential to every field and occupation imaginable. I strongly believe that with the pace technology is moving at, it will continue our lifestyle up to a point where everything will be accessible by everyone, anywhere.

Click to read Javier’s entire essay and vote!

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